Posted by BCM Office of Communications

It’s time to get SMART about summer school

It’s time to get SMART about summer school

Each summer, the halls of Baylor College of Medicine are filled with undergraduate students from around the country who are taking advantage of an opportunity to get hands-on research experience. The Summer Medical and Research Training (SMART) Program recruits about 80 students from undergraduate institutions around the country for nine weeks of paid biomedical related … Continue reading

Holidays can mean added sugar intake

Holidays can mean added sugar intake

The holidays are filled with parties and celebrations, which can also mean more desserts and treats. Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital Registered Dietitian Roberta Anding said seasonal indulging can lead to an increase in the amount of added sugar in our diets. “The American Heart Association recommends no more than 100 calories … Continue reading

Throwback Thursday: Student candids

Throwback Thursday: Student candids

This week we take a look back at our students in 1917 and student life in Dallas. (Remember we didn’t move to Houston until 1947.) This photo, courtesy of the Baylor College of Medicine Archives, was included in the 1917 Baylor University Round Up Yearbook. To put this time into perspective, remember that the United States had … Continue reading

In the genes: Family quests for glioblastoma answers

In the genes: Family quests for glioblastoma answers

When glioblastoma hit their family for a second time, sisters Hadley Rierson and Carrie Lebovich teamed up with Baylor College of Medicine’s Dr. Melissa Bondy. In June, 2013 our family received devastating news: Our 69-year-old father had glioblastoma multiforme, also known as GBM, a rare and deadly brain cancer with a median survival of 10-15 … Continue reading

Is your lunchbox lacking? Tips for packing healthier lunches

Is your lunchbox lacking? Tips for packing healthier lunches

While they may be packed with love, researchers at the USDA/ARS Children’s Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital found most lunches packed at home don’t meet federal nutrition guidelines. The study found that lunches from home had more sodium and fewer servings of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and milk. About 90 percent … Continue reading

Throwback Thursday: Covering home

Throwback Thursday: Covering home

As if studying and practicing medicine weren’t enough, Baylor College of Medicine students find ways to explore their passions. In 1917, that included a baseball team. This photo, courtesy of the Baylor College of Medicine Archives, was included in the 1909 Round Up yearbook from Baylor University. (Remember we didn’t officially become Baylor College of … Continue reading

Doing good on #GivingTuesday

Doing good on #GivingTuesday

We’ve celebrated Thanksgiving, braved (or avoided) the crush of holiday shoppers on Black Friday and checked out the deals online during Cyber Monday. #GivingTuesday, a global day dedicated to philanthropy, volunteering and giving, now in its third year, aims to celebrate “the power of giving in all its forms,” according to the United Nations Foundation, which … Continue reading

Curb buyer’s remorse: Skip drinks while holiday shopping

Curb buyer’s remorse: Skip drinks while holiday shopping

Preparing for some marathon holiday shopping? Baylor College of Medicine Psychiatrist Dr. Kristin Kassaw says don’t add alcohol to the mix. “Alcohol impairs judgment and decreases inhibitions,” said Kassaw, an associate professor of psychiatry at Baylor. “You may come home with shopping bags full of impulse buys that you ordinarily wouldn’t buy.” Kassaw recommends taking an extra … Continue reading

Running can be good for your knee health

Running can be good for your knee health

Some people worry that running will cause knee osteoarthritis characterized by progressive damage to the joint cartilage—the cushioning material at the end of long bones—and causes changes in the structures around the joint. Think again. New research led by Dr. Grace Hsiao-Wei Lo, assistant professor of medicine at Baylor College of Medicine, found that a … Continue reading

Overactive bladder: Overcoming the urge

Overactive bladder: Overcoming the urge

Many women suffer from the “closet disorder” – overactive bladder. “Life isn’t easy for the millions of women suffering from an overactive bladder,” said Dr. Francisco Orejuela, associate professor at Baylor College of Medicine and urogynecologist at Texas Children’s Hospital. “Overactive bladder can wreak havoc on a patient’s life by disrupting work, sleep and social … Continue reading

Swaps offer healthier take on green bean casserole recipe

Swaps offer healthier take on green bean casserole recipe

For people watching their weight, the holidays can be a careful balancing act of enjoying favorite dishes without overindulging. Students from Baylor College of Medicine, who help host the Texas Children’s Hospital Adolescent Bariatric Cook Class, say look no further than best-selling author and registered dietitian Ellie Krieger for awesome recipes that encourage a balance … Continue reading

Chest pains: Heartburn or heart attack?

Chest pains: Heartburn or heart attack?

The holiday season means friends, family and good cheer, usually taking place around the dinner table. While a big meal may cause heartburn or aggravate chronic acid reflux, Baylor College of Medicine gastroenterology expert Dr. Lubin F. Arevalo, says you should not ignore these symptoms. “Some people suffer from chest pain that they describe as … Continue reading

Throwback Thursday: In the Navy

Throwback Thursday: In the Navy

Baylor College of Medicine has enjoyed a rich military history. In this photo from the 1918 Baylor University Round Up yearbook, members of The Navy Club pose for a photo in their uniforms.   Learn more about the College’s military past: Baylor University College of Medicine’s Army interns Medicine and the military at the College … Continue reading

Headaches: Are yours more serious than the common headache?

Headaches: Are yours more serious than the common headache?

Do you get headaches? It can be from loud music, stress from work, or possibly a lack of sleep. Irritating headaches are common, but are you able to tell whether it is a sign of something more serious? Experts at Baylor Family Medicine break down the differences and explain. Types of headaches and treatments Tension headaches: This kind of pain typically … Continue reading

Physical symptoms could be sign of depression

Physical symptoms could be sign of depression

Depression and chronic mood disorders can manifest themselves through physical symptoms, said an expert at Baylor College of Medicine. “Physical symptoms often drive a patient to see a primary care physician, and then the diagnosis of depression may emerge,” said Dr. Sanjay Mathew, associate professor in the Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Symptoms … Continue reading

Throwback Thursday: More than science and medicine

Throwback Thursday: More than science and medicine

Beyond the classroom, the studying and effort Baylor College of Medicine students put in to obtaining a medical education, they pursue their passions. In this photo, originally from the 1974 Aesculapian Yearbook, a student indulges in pursuits outside of medicine, science and research. Today our students have the opportunity to: Explore their musical talents through … Continue reading

All-natural ingredients can still irritate skin

All-natural ingredients can still irritate skin

If you want your skin to glow, experts at Baylor College of Medicine say all natural products might not be the answer. “Some people think that by going all natural with their skin care, that it will automatically be safer for their skin. That’s not necessarily the case,” said Dr. Rajani Katta, professor of dermatology … Continue reading

Exercise does the elderly body good

Exercise does the elderly body good

Exercise can’t stop the aging process, but experts at Baylor College of Medicine say that for the elderly, whether it’s weight training, walking, swimming or biking, 30 minutes of exercise three to five times a week is a good prescription for aging. “It’s never too late to start exercising,” said Dr. Robert Roush, an associate … Continue reading

Integrated Microscopy Core: Revolutionizing scientific discovery

Integrated Microscopy Core: Revolutionizing scientific discovery

This feature is part of a series that focuses on VIICTR.org, highlighting clinical and translational research at Baylor College of Medicine. The ability to microscopically visualize the tiniest of molecules provides the backbone of basic medical research. Michael Mancini, Ph.D., director of Baylor College of Medicine’s Integrated Microscopy Core, explains the core’s strong set of automated platforms … Continue reading

Day in the life: Maintaining the integrity of the student record

Day in the life: Maintaining the integrity of the student record

Meet Latoya Whitaker, Baylor College of Medicine’s registrar. Whitaker says she enjoys helping students, alumni and staff with their various needs throughout the day. Learn more about Whitaker’s work. Interested in joining the Baylor family? Check out career opportunities and follow our Office of Human Resources job postings on Twitter. -By Audrey M. Marks

Throwback Thursday: Ready for Halloween?

Throwback Thursday: Ready for Halloween?

Need an idea for a quick Halloween costume? Take a cue from our students and regress. This Throwback Thursday we travel back in time to the late 1980s with this photo courtesy of the Baylor College of Medicine Archives. Our students celebrate the holiday in this photo that originally appeared in the 1987 Aesculapian Yearbook. … Continue reading

New technology helps diagnose balance disorders

New technology helps diagnose balance disorders

Baylor College of Medicine’s Center for Balance Disorders is using cutting-edge technology to help diagnose patients with balance disorders, through a new rotary chair. Dizziness and imbalance are common complaints that physicians hear and can be caused by a number of things, including: Poor circulation Heart problems Inner ear problems Diet Stroke “Once more life-threatening … Continue reading

Twenty-one days: Reflecting on Ebola, healthcare

Twenty-one days: Reflecting on Ebola, healthcare

After returning from Nigeria, Dr. Sarah Bezek reflected on her experience as a member of Baylor College of Medicine’s team that traveled to train healthcare providers and non-medical personnel in the basic facts about Ebola. She shares her thoughts while monitoring her health since returning and waiting for the 21-day mark for incubation to pass. Twenty-one days – … Continue reading

Throwback Thursday: Timeless style

Throwback Thursday: Timeless style

When it comes to style, the men of Baylor College of Medicine have it locked down. This week’s photo, courtesy of the Baylor College of Medicine Archives, comes to us from the 1985 Aesculpaian Yearbook. While styles may change, a bow tie always makes an impact. Who is your favorite dapper doctor at Baylor? Let … Continue reading

Skip sugar to help keep skin wrinkle-free

Skip sugar to help keep skin wrinkle-free

Don’t let all the Halloween candy make your skin look spooky. Dr. Rajani Katta, professor of dermatology at Baylor College of Medicine, says certain foods— not just sweets— can cause “sugar sag,” where skin loosens and wrinkles. “The idea behind preventing sugar sag is ‘better skin from the inside out,’” said Katta. “What you eat … Continue reading

Vaccines to treat addictions?

Vaccines to treat addictions?

Could a vaccine be used in the future to treat an addiction to nicotine, cocaine, methamphetamine and opiates? Dr. Thomas Kosten, professor and the Jay H. Waggoner Endowed Chair in the Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Baylor College of Medicine has dedicated two decades on developing these vaccines. Kosten talks with John … Continue reading

Huda Zoghbi: A lab of her own

Huda Zoghbi: A lab of her own

Immigrants make the journey to the United States for a number of reasons.  For physician and medical researcher Huda Zoghbi, her journey began with a dangerous war that left her no choice. Growing up in Beirut, Lebanon, Huda could not have been any happier.  The city’s peaceful and vibrant atmosphere in the 1970s was inviting … Continue reading

Online event provides perspective students insight into admissions, College

Online event provides perspective students insight into admissions, College

In collaboration with other biomedical graduate programs across the country, students can learn more about graduate educational opportunities at Baylor College of Medicine Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences through an Internet connection.   Our Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences will be participating in two free virtual grad school fairs this month: Oct. 22: Joining more … Continue reading

Throwback Thursday: Poetic praise

Throwback Thursday: Poetic praise

In a form as old as Ancient Greece, this Throwback Thursday we travel back in time and revisit an elaborate lyrical poem praising Baylor College of Medicine. In this image, courtesy of the Baylor College of Medicine Archives, found in the Baylor University Round Up Yearbook from 1918, Carl S. Wilson rhymes his way through … Continue reading

Diabetics shouldn’t spook at Halloween

Diabetics shouldn’t spook at Halloween

Halloween shouldn’t be scary for children with diabetes. It’s important for kids to participate in fun activities like they did before being diagnosed. Experts at Baylor College of Medicine encourage parents to plan ahead and know what activities they’ll be attending. Whether it’s a festival, haunted house or trick-or-treating, you need to be prepared. “With … Continue reading

Why metastatic breast cancer matters

Why metastatic breast cancer matters

Monday Oct. 13, has been declared Metastatic Breast Cancer Awareness Day by the City of Houston. I am so grateful to the city for supporting a cause that I am so passionate about. My life was forever changed in 2010 when my mother was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer.  It was a real shock because … Continue reading

Celebrating PAs this week

Celebrating PAs this week

Every year during the week of Oct. 6-12, we celebrate Physician Assistants through National PA Week. Why this week you might ask? Oct. 6, 1967, was the date of the first graduating PA class at Duke University. The program, and was profession, was established by Eugene Stead, M.D. based on the fast-track training module used … Continue reading